DrugInformer Search

Gynaecomastia : Tamoxifen Citrate Vs. Anastrozole

Definition

Gynecomastia, pronounced /ˌɡaɪnɨkɵˈmæstiə/, is the development of abnormally large mammary glands in males resulting in breast enlargement. The term comes from the Greek γυνή gyne (stem gynaik-) meaning "woman" and μαστός mastos meaning "breast". The condition can occur physiologically in neonates (due to female hormones from the mother), in adolescence, and in the elderly. In adolescent boys the condition is often a source of distress, but for the large majority of boys whose pubescent gynecomastia is not due to obesity, the breast development shrinks or disappears within a couple of years. The causes of common gynecomastia remain uncertain, although it has generally been attributed to an imbalance of sex hormones or the tissue responsiveness to them; a root cause is rarely determined for individual cases. The condition may also be caused due to an imbalance of estrogenic and androgenic effects on the breast, resulting in an increased or unopposed estrogen action on breast tissue. Approximately 4 to 10% cases of gynecomastia are due to drugs. Both Digoxin and Furosemide are reported to cause the same condition. Although, chances of gynecomastia could be more if these two drugs are coadministered . Breast prominence can result from hypertrophy of breast tissue, chest adipose tissue (fat) and skin, and is typically a combination. Breast prominence due solely to excessive adipose is often termed pseudogynecomastia or sometimes lipomastia.

Read more on Wikipedia

Compare Drugs

Please add a drug to the list to compare them side by side.
Add a new Drug

* Warning: The facts and figures contained in these reports are accurate to the best of our capability; however, our metrics are only meant to augment your medical knowledge, and should never be used as the sole basis for selecting a new medication. As with any medical decision, be sure to work with your doctor to ensure the best choices are made for your condition.

* About FAERS: The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used by FDA for activities such as looking for new safety concerns that might be related to a marketed product, evaluating a manufacturer's compliance to reporting regulations and responding to outside requests for information. Reporting of adverse events is a voluntary process, and not every report is sent to FDA and entered into FAERS. The FAERS database may contain duplicate reports, the report quality is variable, and many factors may influence reporting (e.g., media attention, length of time a drug is marketed, market share). For these reasons, FAERS case reports cannot be used to calculate incidence or estimates of risk for a particular product or compare risks between products.