DrugInformer Search

Malaria Prophylaxis : Mefloquine Hydrochloride Vs. Atovaquone; Proguanil Hydrochloride

Definition

Malaria prophylaxis is the prevention of malaria. Malaria is one of the oldest known pathogens, and began having a major impact on human survival about 10,000 years ago with the birth of agriculture. The development of virulence in the parasite has been demonstrated using genomic mapping of samples from this period, confirming the emergence of genes conferring a reduced risk of developing the malaria infection. References to the disease can be found in manuscripts from ancient Egypt, India and China, illustrating its wide geographical distribution. The first treatment identified is thought to be Quinine, one of four alkaloids from the bark of the Cinchona tree. Originally it was used by the tribes of Ecuador and Peru for treating fevers. Its role in treating malaria was recognised and recorded first by an Augustine monk from Lima, Peru in 1633. Seven years later the drug had reached Europe and was being used widely with the name ‘the Jesuit's bark’. From this point onwards the use of Quinine and the public interest in malaria increased, although the compound was not isolated and identified as the active ingredient until 1820. By the mid-1880’s the Dutch had grown vast plantations of cinchona trees and monopolised the world market.

Read more on Wikipedia

Compare Drugs

Please add a drug to the list to compare them side by side.
Add a new Drug

* Warning: The facts and figures contained in these reports are accurate to the best of our capability; however, our metrics are only meant to augment your medical knowledge, and should never be used as the sole basis for selecting a new medication. As with any medical decision, be sure to work with your doctor to ensure the best choices are made for your condition.

* About FAERS: The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used by FDA for activities such as looking for new safety concerns that might be related to a marketed product, evaluating a manufacturer's compliance to reporting regulations and responding to outside requests for information. Reporting of adverse events is a voluntary process, and not every report is sent to FDA and entered into FAERS. The FAERS database may contain duplicate reports, the report quality is variable, and many factors may influence reporting (e.g., media attention, length of time a drug is marketed, market share). For these reasons, FAERS case reports cannot be used to calculate incidence or estimates of risk for a particular product or compare risks between products.