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Mesalamine

Ingredients: Mesalamine
Average User Review Score
* Based on 36 reviews from across the web.
Wikipedia

Mesalazine (INN, BAN), also known as mesalamine (USAN) or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), is an anti-inflammatory drug used to treat inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis. Sandborn WJ, Feagan BG, Lichtenstein GR (October 2007). "Medical management of mild to moderate Crohn's disease: evidence-based treatment algorithms for induction and maintenance of remission". Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics 26 (7): 987–1003. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2036.2007.03455.x. PMID 17877506. Retrieved 2009-12-20. </ref> Mesalazine is a bowel-specific aminosalicylate drug that acts locally in the gut and has its predominant actions there, thereby having few systemic side effects.

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* Extracted from FDA Adverse Event Reports for all drugs with the same active ingredients.

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Druginformer Identified Side Effects: None

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on March 11, 2014 @ 12:00 am

Works well for me.

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: None

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on January 12, 2014 @ 12:00 am

Significantly reduces my Crohn's symptoms.

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: None

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on January 11, 2014 @ 12:00 am

Salokfalk and then Prednisolone stopped the diarrhoea but not the blood, but within a week of talking one Mesalazine (UK name) tablet twice a day everything was pretty much back to normal.

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: None

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on January 11, 2014 @ 12:00 am

Working very good

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: Headache, Night sweats, Alopecia, Abdominal distension, Adverse drug reaction

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on October 16, 2013 @ 12:00 am

Hair loss, bloating, headache, night sweats, stretch marks on inner thighs and increased frequency on bowel motion.

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: Condition aggravated

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on August 6, 2013 @ 12:00 am

Diagnosed with ulcerative colitis a year ago. Took medicine for a month. Cleared up. Recently, another flare up. Am taking again and is slowly clearing up again.

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: Nausea, Acne, Diarrhoea, Somnolence

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on July 30, 2013 @ 12:00 am

... Colitis 10 days ago. Started 800MG 2 tablets, 3 times/day plus suppository at night. Diarrhea quickly went down to once a day instead of eight times. Experiencing fatigue, slight nausea and seem to...

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: Condition aggravated, Weight increased, Liver function test

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on June 19, 2013 @ 12:00 am

... about 1 year after an emergency surgery for a mass in my colon due to a build up of scar tissue from inflammation. After a couple months of 500mg 3X a day frequency of flare ups were greatly reduced. ...

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: None

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on June 8, 2013 @ 12:00 am

Is good

Druginformer Identified Side Effects: None

Posted By Anonymous in drugs.com on May 12, 2013 @ 12:00 am

Great, the only medicine that got me under control, no more bathroom mapping while leaving the house.


* Warning: The facts and figures contained in these reports are accurate to the best of our capability; however, our metrics are only meant to augment your medical knowledge, and should never be used as the sole basis for selecting a new medication. As with any medical decision, be sure to work with your doctor to ensure the best choices are made for your condition.

* About FAERS: The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used by FDA for activities such as looking for new safety concerns that might be related to a marketed product, evaluating a manufacturer's compliance to reporting regulations and responding to outside requests for information. Reporting of adverse events is a voluntary process, and not every report is sent to FDA and entered into FAERS. The FAERS database may contain duplicate reports, the report quality is variable, and many factors may influence reporting (e.g., media attention, length of time a drug is marketed, market share). For these reasons, FAERS case reports cannot be used to calculate incidence or estimates of risk for a particular product or compare risks between products.